Hikes & Trips

Past, Present & Future


NEXT UP: Hiking from Canada to the Sound (August 2018)

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We'll begin this hike at the Northern Terminus of the Cohos Trail at the Canadian Border and follow that trail through New Hampshire and eventually land on the AT. Once reaching Massachusetts, we'll follow existing trails and roads to connect to the New England Trail, which will lead eventually bring us to the Connecticut Sound. All together, this will be about 600 beautiful miles. Following that, I plan to hike the Long Trail (273 miles) northbound in a quick and unsupported fashion. 


CONTINENTAL DIVIDE TRAIL

JULY- NOVEMBER 2017

Traveling through the incredibly remote and diverse landscape along the Continental Divide, I walked in absolute terrain and weather. A small, tight-knit community thrived to share the unique experience of this thru-hike. The trail travels 3,000 rugged miles of the Rocky Mountains through Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico. Incredible is an understatement. 

SCANDINAVIA & SWITZERLAND

JUNE 2017

A family trip to the Scandinavian cities of Gothenburg, Sweden, Oslo, Norway, and Copenhagen, Denmark involved exquisite foods and long urban walks. There, I searched for historical architecture and lush green parks. I then headed to Southern Switzerland to emerge in the French Culture, swim in teal glacier-fed lakes and hike in the Alps (including an epic trip around the Matterhorn). 


PACIFIC CREST TRAIL

AUGUST-OCTOBER 2016

A spontaneous start on the PCT heading north from Ashland, OR had me walking with little expectations. Entranced by simplicity of the trail, and the incredible people, I found myself walking to Canada. By the boarder, nearly 1,000 miles later, I decided to hike as much of the 2,660 mile trail as I could before winter hit the mountains. I drove to Southern California, where we’d walk south for 500 more miles. I still have the Sierras and Northern California to finish another year. 

SOUTHWEST ROAD TRIP

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2016

After months of hiking, adjusting back into fast paced city life is challenging. I jumped at the chance to drive around the Southwest with a friend and put off going back to work. We spent four weeks living out of my car on backroads, visiting as many National Parks and breweries as we could throughout Colorado, Utah and Arizona. 


GREAT DIVIDE MTN. BIKE ROUTE

SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER 2015

While I was hiking the Appalachian Mountains, my dad was cycling the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route in the Rockies. Once I finished, I joined and drove a truck along the remote roads of Colorado and New Mexico to provide support to him and other cyclists on the same trip. My backcountry driving and navigating skills were sharpened, and I happily explored parts of the CDT before reaching the Mexican boarder. 

COAST TO COAST ROAD TRIP

JULY 2016

After seven months of working, I left Maine and headed to the West Coast. With no time restraints, I took a month to drive nearly 5,000 miles across the country, making stops in Lexington, KY, the Wind River Range in Wyoming, and Oregon. My cousin even came to join me in the fun. After camping, hiking and drinking beers in every corner of Oregon, I parked my car in Ashland and set out hiking the PCT. 


NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

JUNE 2014

For one of my first solo trips, I flew to San Francisco and lived out of a backpack for several weeks, checking out the city’s best eats and markets. Most of my time was spent in Humboldt County, visiting a friend’s beautiful ranch land nestled in the hills between the Mendocino and Shasta-Trinity National Forests. There, we’d search for hidden creeks to cool off in.

APPALACHIAN TRAIL

MAY-SEPTEMBER 2015

A few years prior, I’d decided to culminate my undergrad by bringing my love of being outdoors and physical challenges to a long distance trail. I walked from Georgia through fourteen states, heading north to Mount Katahdin, Maine. During these four months, my world was opened up and energized in such a way that it would never be the same. After 2,189 miles, I decided that this hike didn’t need to be an isolated experience - I could make it a lifestyle.